Calendula

Calendula

Calendula, a versatile herb, is the essential oil from the pot marigold. This plant has been used since the 12th century for its medicinal properties. Studies abound on its healing ability on the skin specifically on burn victims. Due to its high level of vitamin A compounds (carotenoids) it is also known to calm skin irritations such as rashes, dermatitis, acne and chapped skin. Cream made with calendula, is recommended to those with breast cancer to ease dermatitis and skin challenges during radiation and chemo.

It is known as the poor man’s saffron as it can be used in cooking as a substitute. The petals also make a lovely dye. Another benefit of marigolds is Mother Nature’s bug repellant, planting them around your tomatoes so the bugs won’t eat them. Marigold petals are edible and add a lovely tang to salads.

Marigolds

Marigolds native to Mexico, were taken to Europe and Asia in the 16th century. There are over 50 species of this earthy plant. To the Welsh, marigolds were “herb of the sun” and if they were not open in the morning a storm was coming. They were used as love charms, and were thought to produce visions of fairies if rubbed on the eyes. Others considered marigold poisonous due to the heavy aroma. In Mexico we were surrounded by marigolds on dia de los muertos, and while in India marigolds were omnipresent. Ironically it wasn’t in Mexico that I learned to appreciate marigolds but in Thailand and India.

We use calendula oil in our marigold toner, marigold bergamot dry oil, marigold cleanser and marigold face kit.

Lavender

Lavender love

My love of lavender began while living in France. The decadent rows of it in the south of France and all the creams and potions were just divine. However, it wasn’t until I moved back home and visited Sequim (pronounced Squeem not seqeem), Washington that I seriously thought about having a lavender farm, a dream that might still come to fruition but very hard to do in Georgia. The Pacific Northwest although rainy, has some of the best in the country and the entire town of Sequim thrives and is dedicated to this dynamic herb. After losing industry in the community they decided to plant fields of the plants  and voila a thriving festival and businesses bloomed.

Lavender History

The history of aromatherapy is thanks to this aromatic herb. Rene Gattefosse burned his hand and used the oil to stop the pain. It healed the hand without scarring or infection. However, the French have the Romans to thank for Provence’s abundance of  farms. The Romans introduced the herb to France. It is thought that the name comes from Latin “lavare” to wash of ‘livendulo” livid or bluish. Before World War 1 the French government cleared the almond orchards. They replaced them with lavender in the hopes of keeping the population there instead of fleeing.

Lavender Uses

In ancient Egypt the flowers were used for embalming, cosmetics, massage oils and as perfume. Egyptians would put it on their heads. The Greeks would anoint their feet. According to the Greek Philosopher Diogenes “When you anoint your head with perfume, it flies away in the air and only the birds get the benefit of it, whilst if I rub it on my lower limbs it envelopes my whole body and gratefully ascends to my nose”. During Nero’s time it was used for indigestion, headaches and to clean wounds. It is said that the plant was first domesticated in the Arab world. They dominated the Mediterranean culture, specifically Spain and from there lavender spread. Fast forward to the Middle Ages and it was used to raise money for King Edward 1. King Charles V1 of France stuffed his pillows with the flower buds. It was also used to treat lice and other pests.

Lavender has been a cure all for centuries, from linen, to inciting passion, repelling insects etc. etc.It takes approximately 175 lbs of the flower buds to make one ounce of essential oil. Lavender hand cream is the second product I made and the first featured in a national magazine. You will find it in skin therapy blended with lime essential oil. Our cleansing oil and lavender mist also contain the essential oil. This essential oil is the most widely used oil probably due to its medicinal properties. I love it because it is relaxing and makes me dream ;).

 

 

Helichrysum

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Helichrysum the Plant

Helichrysum, a member of the asteracea family, is a medicinal plant that is native to the Mediterranean. It is grown in dry climates throughout the globe. There are over 600 species of these perennial flowering shrubs. The name comes from Greek, “helios referring to sun and “chrysos” gold. It is also known as the curry plant because of the aroma it produces. It is also referred to as immortelle or everlasting because once the flowers are dried, they maintain their yellow color and aroma. 

Essential Oil

Helichrysum italicum, grown in the Mediterranean, is the most common plant to extract the essential oil. It was first distilled in 1908 in Dalmatia. It is a relatively late newcomer to aromatherapy. The oil is extracted by steam from fresh flower heads. The distillation must be done within 24 hours of picking the flowers. Its aroma is slightly herbaceous and tart. In perfumes, it is a middle note.

European studies indicate that helichrysum essential oil is effective in minimizing scarring and healing wounds. It has anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties as well as being cell-regenerative. It can also soothe anger and stress. It has long been used in Europe for migrain headache pain.

Find it

Restorative and effective, you can enjoy helichrysum essential oil  in HollyBeth Organics rose geranium toner combined with rose geranium and rose distillates. We have also blended it in  HollyBeth Organics face and neck elixir with rose geranium essential oil in a base of: camellia, sunflower, rosehip, and carrot oils. A nutrient rich dry oil for your skin. 

Grape seed oil benefits


What are the benefits of grape seed oil? Although grapes have been touted for over 6000 years for their medicinal properties; grape seed oil only surfaced in the 20th century.

Grape seed oil benefits

Grape seed oil is light and non-greasy. It is non-comedogenic, it will not clog your pores; it is quickly absorbed by the skin. It will leave skin hydrated and smooth.

Grape seed oil is full of flavonoids, anti-oxidants, linoleic acid and Vitamin C and E that remove debris and free radicals. These components promote the rejuvenation of collagen increasing the skin’s elasticity. An Ohio State University conducted a study on the benefits of grape seed oil. The result of the test indicated that grapeseed oil may speed up the healing process of wounds on the skin.

Scientists have found that the linoleic acid naturally present in the oil is beneficial for the treatment of , dermatitis, allergic reactions, eczema, and dry and itchy skin. Grapeseed oil benefits also include healing of acne, the inflammation that is caused due to blemishing.

Seeds of grapes are cold pressed to produce the light oil. The same grapes that are used for wine are used for their seeds.  This makes the grape business double duty in some ways. The finished product has a 2 year shelf life but should be kept refrigerated to prevent rancidity. The color is light green with a slightly nutty aroma.

Our certified organic marigold bergamot dry oil is made with organic grapeseed oil and jojoba oil infused with calendula and bergamot. Our customers prone to break outs swear by it. They first cleanse with our marigold foaming cleanser, then apply the dry oil. Some follow up with a spritz of marigold toner.

Grape seed oil is wonderful alternative to the harsh peels and/or chemicals for blemish prone skin.

Prickly Pear Seed Oil

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prickly pear

Prickly Pear Seed Oil, Barbary Fig Seed Oil

Origin

Prickly pear seed oil is a fairly newcomer to the beauty industry but one that is quite in vogue, no matter if you call it barbary fig oil, cactus fruit seed oil or opuntia ficus-inidica seed oil. However, in Mexico, I always knew  that a prickly pear is a  “tuna”, the fruit of a cactus called Nopal. Nopal is a cactus that is native to the Americas. Mexico, with over 80 different varieties of tuna, is the top producer and exporter.

Prickly Pear

Peeling a prickly pear or tuna is a delicate endeavor as it is full of small “espinas” thorns that can get under the skin. But once peeled it is a delicious treat. The fruit is used to make “agua frescas” or lemonade, marmalades, gorditas, gelatin, alcohol and in salsas. Prickly pears are quite versatile; however, my favorite way to eat them is just peel and eaten raw.

Prickly pear seed oil

Prickly pear seed oil is pressed from the seeds and depending on who you ask, it takes approximately 8 tons of cactus fruit to make one liter of  oil. The  seeds are hard and must be pressed to make the precious oil. You can see how it is our costliest ingredient and we buy only organic certified.

Here is a great article on the properties of the oil. The oil contains linoleic acid, phytosterols, polyphenols and Vitamin E. Therefore, it contains all your your skin needs to retain moisture, protect and nourish your skin.

Our skin therapy has prickly pear seed oil, camellia seed oil, beeswax, infused with lavender and lime. It is a customer favorite as it only take a small amount to hydrate the skin. Some of our fans also use it as a make-up remover. However you use it, you will love the delicate calming aroma that lingers on your skin.

 

 

 

Grapefruit Essential Oil

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Grapefruit Essential Oil

Grapefruit essential oil is a great addition to one’s wellness routine. It is full of vitamin C and antioxidants. HollyBeth uses grapefruit essential oil in several of her products, for it greatly benefits the health of the skin.

Origins of The Grapefruit

Grapefruit, Citirus Paradici, is the only citrus fruit whose beginnings are rooted in the West Indies, rather than Southeast Asia. Some believe Captain Shaddock introduced pomelo seeds to Jamaica, therefore engendering an accidental hybrid of sweet orange and pomelo called the forbidden fruit. There is no record to back up this theory, therefore scientists believe the grapefruit is a natural hybrid. In 1750, the Rev. Griffith Hughes writes of the forbidden fruit in his book the Natural History of Barbados, the hybrid’s first documented mention. In the 1800’s, a farmer dubbed the forbidden fruit grapefruit for the way it grows in grape-like clusters. The grapefruit eventually made its way to the US in 1823 thanks to French settlers.

Benefits

The rind of the grapefruit is cold-pressed for essential oil. The oil aids digestion, boosts  immunity, and works as an antiseptic. Its fragrance also helps with fatigue and anxiety. Most of all, grapefruit essential oil nourishes the skin. It cleanses and purifies, calming irritation and balancing the skin, while boosting the skin’s immunity. It is a great aid in clearing acne and oily skin, as well as regulating the production of sebum and skin irritations. Plus, it smells amazing!

Grapefruit Essential Oil Skin Care Solutions

HollyBeth uses grapefruit essential oil in several of her products because of its many benefits. You can find grapefruit essential oil hard at work in her Marigold Foaming Facial Cleanser, a must-have for acne-prone skin. Her Body Mist utilizes the oil for hydration, while her Body Balm packs Vitamin C into the skin. A huge thank you to the grapefruit for its amazing essential oil!

Essential Oils & Aromatherapy

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Essential Oils & Aromatherapy

History

Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines aromatherapy as “the use of natural oils that have a pleasant smell to make a person feel better especially by rubbing the oils into the skin.” The use of essential oils for aromatherapy dates back over 6,000 year ago to Egyptian times, spreading quickly to Israel, Greece, and Rome. Throughout the entire Mediterranean region, essential oils were used in massages, burned in incense, and utilized as perfumes for their fragrant, energizing properties. Though the use of essential oils began to decline upon the arrival of modern science, a contemporary resurgence and enthusiasm has reignited the use of these naturally powerful oils.

Aromatherapeutic Flourish Calming Perfume

Each essential oil delivers its own fragrance and therapeutic benefit. HollyBeth designed her new Flourish Calming Perfume to evoke feelings of tranquility and reduce stress utilizing specific essential oils known to calm the senses (and smell great!).  The earthy, citrus perfume utilizes bergamot, cedarwood, and ylang ylang to ease stress and relieve anxiety, marjoram to combat fatigue, and rose geranium and chamomile to soothe and uplift the spirits. Simply apply the perfume to the skin via rollerball application, allow to dry, and inhale the aroma deeply. Voila! An instant mood boost.

Whether you’ve had a tiring day of traveling, a long day at work, or just want to smell something pleasing, revive your spirits with some of Mother Nature’s stress-relieving oils.

Marjoram

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History

Marjoram (Organum Marjorana) is a perennial herb belonging to the mint family. With rounded, pale green leaves, Marjoram is often mistaken for oregano; however, it has a sweeter taste and a more delicate nature, preferring moister soil and warmer climates. Originating in Asia Minor and the Mediterranean region, the herb was acclaimed in Egyptian, Roman, and Greek culture. The Greeks called marjoram “joy of the mountain,” crowing newly married couples with it as a celebration of love and good fortune. Aphrodite, the goddess of love, was said to grow and treasure marjoram, making it a popular herb for love spells. When placed under the pillow of a young woman, it was believed to reveal her future husband in her dreams.

Medicinal Uses

Marjoram is also renowned for its medicinal properties. Extremely beneficial to the stomach, it aids in digestion, calms cramps, alleviates nausea, and relieves upset bowels. Its antiseptic, antiviral, and antibacterial properties help the body fight sickness, including food poisoning, malaria, staph, and the flu. Marjoram even improves circulatory function, helping lower blood pressure and cholesterol, while its anti-inflammatory properties soothe head, body, tooth, and muscle aches.

Aromatherapy

Marjoram’s aromatic properties make it the ultimate stress reliever. Testing has shown that marjoram’s tranquil aroma relaxes brain waves. It soothes the senses, alleviates anxiety, reduces stress, and even helps with insomnia.

Marjoram’s warm, woodsy fragrance and natural calming abilities are celebrated in HollyBeth Organics’ new Flourish® calming perfume. This double-duty perfume delights the senses and the mind.

The Benefits of Geranium Oil

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The Benefits of Geranium Oil

There are about 250 naturally growing species of scented geraniums (Pelargonium), most of which are native to South Africa. Geraniums come in many different colors and scents; however, only a few types of geraniums are capable of producing copious, quality essential oil, which is extracted through steam distillation of the stems and leaves of the plant.

History of Geraniums

The use of geranium oil dates back to ancient Egypt, where it was used to treat cancer. Ancient Greeks utilized geranium oil to treat wounds and speed up the healing process. In the late 17th century, geraniums became a part of Victorian parlor etiquette, adorning tables as a revitalizing potpourri and a garnish for finger bowls. Geraniums are now a popular staple in gardens worldwide.

Benefits of Geranium Oil for Skin

The many benefits of geranium oil make it a popular ingredient in HollyBeth’s products. Its astringent properties tighten the skin to reduce wrinkles while increasing blood flow below the surface of the face to promote the healing of acne, age spots, and scars and encourage new cell growth. It is Mother Nature’s anti-aging serum!

Benefits of Geranium Oil for Body & Mind

Geranium oil is also a great medicinal tool. It helps balance hormones, ease nerve pain, fight infection, heal wounds, and improve mental function as a natural anti-depressant and anxiety reliever. Geranium oil can even be used as a deodorant and bug repellent. And of course, it smells great, too!

The beauty of geraniums is much more than skin deep! These lovely flowers are true gift of nature for the mind, body, and spirit.

Click here to discover which HollyBeth Organics products utilize geranium oil.