blueberry the powerhouse

blueberries

blueberry origin

In a recent search, I read that the humble blueberry is considered one of the oldest living plants on the planet. It has an approximate age of 12,500 years. Native to North America, the wild blueberry has spawned over 450 species that grow across the globe. Although not as common in the south as blackberries when I was growing up, it is now a fixture in most backyards. As animals love the fruit this is a great plant to include in your urban garden.

blueberry folklore

Native to America, Native Americans smoked the berries to preserve them. They used the blueberry to make a jerky that would last during the winter. The roots of the berries were made in tea that was used to soothe the pains of childbirth, to purify the blood and for coughs. The berries were also used to make dye for textiles. In the south, it was said the tea from blueberry leaves would regulate blood sugar. As a child I remember someone would bring my Grandmother blueberry wine and to this day I think about how I wish I had tried it! According to the University of South Florida it has more antioxidants than red or white grape wine.

blueberry nutrition

A cup of blueberries has 80 calories. But this one cup is chock full of nutritious benefits for you. It contains the daily recommended amount of fiber: 3.6 grams. It contains 25% of your daily Vitamin C needs. These powerhouses also have vitamin K, manganese and iron. In one study Blueberry antioxidant properties have been shown to aid mobility in senior citizens who ate 2 cups of frozen blueberries a day. This fruit has been claimed by some researchers has having more antioxidants than any other fruit.

Because this fruit is so powerful, we included it in our new pore clarifying mask for its bountiful antioxidant properties. We know you will love the way it purifies your pores without drying the skin. Thanks to the blueberry, your skin will be glowing and fresh!

Spring Skincare Products We Love

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On Sale in Honor of Spring!

 

Spring is in the Air

Time to break out your spring skincare products! Now that the sun is out and nature is in bloom, cold winter nights wrapped up inside by the fire are replaced by outside adventures and lighthearted evenings on a patio. Life is in full bloom, and it is time to celebrate.

Spring is a Big Bouquet of Flowers

Bright colors and rich greens rejuvenate sleepy landscapes, and nature fills the air with the budding aroma of flowers, trees, and fruits. Inspired by spring’s natural bounty, HollyBeth created her signature Flourish Perfume, a delightful combination of jasmine and rose mixed with hints of lavender and bergamot. Soft scents of floral and earth perfectly combine to evoke the blooming flavors of a new beginning. It is the perfect perfume to add to your spring skincare products.

Spring is an Orchard of Fresh Fruit

Crisp citrus flavors of orange and lemon energize the spirits and uplift the soul. One of my favorite HollyBeth Organics spring skincare products is her Citrus All Over Cream. A refreshing blend of camellia, jojoba, and sweet almond oil adorned with lemon, lime, and orange essential oils create this delicious moisturizing cream that nourishes the skin and tantalizes the senses. And as an added bonus, the citrus-based cream naturally repels pesky bugs! Looking for a spring skincare shea butter? Try HollyBeth’s Lemon Lime Shea Butter Cream. This southern-inspired cream infused with invigorating lime and lemon enlivens the skin with happy hydration. And in honor of spring, HollyBeth Organics’ Lemon Lime Shea Butter is on sale! Click here to add this zesty moisturizing cream to your spring skincare routine.

Spring has arrived! Time to let your skin enjoy it, too.

Pumpkin Facts

tallpumpkings

Did You Know That a Pumpkin is a Fruit?

Yes, the countless varieties of pumpkins are in the same family as squash, cucumbers and melons. Its origin dates back to about 5000 B.C. in North America. Pumpkins are among the most versatile fruits that exist. The shells have been used to make bowls and mats by Native Americans. Medicinally, they have been used to treat acne, fever, parasites, and kidney problems etc. etc. Long a staple in diets, the flowers seeds and meat are considered delicacies in certain cultures.

What About Pumpkin Seed Oil?

We all know about the virtues of pumpkin pies and roasted seeds, but the pumpkin seed oil is the prize for me. Pumpkin seed oil is packed with everything you need for glowing skin. Pumpkin seed oil contains fatty acids, alpha hydroxy acid, vitamins A, C,  E, and zinc. The oil is a powerhouse of anti-aging ingredients that boost collagen production, increase cell renewal that brightens and smooths the skin. Other added benefits include the diminishing of environmental skin damage and reducing break outs. If you love pumpkin seed oil – try our nourishing body oil and body oil.

Bumble Bees

bumblebeelavender

Bumble bees, native to the United States, not like the humble honey bee that was imported in the 1600s from Europe are in danger. As with all 250 species of bees, they are in dire trouble and dying off. That is why I delight when my backyard is a bevy of buzz with all types of bees. I try and plant as many bee friendly plants as possible.

A bumble bee is differentiated from the carpenter bee by having a fuzzy, hairy body. They live in underground colonies, and die in the winter, except the queen. The wings beat 130 times a second. They pollinate plants that are eaten by humans, birds and insects, like cotton, apples, cherries and tomatoes. Unlike the aggressive yellow jackets, they will not attract and sting you. While I took the photo, they were all oblivious to me, intent on the lavender.

Plant native plants in your backyard and leave empty underground nests that have been vacated by rodents free for them. And of course plant more bee friendly plants in your yard. And please don’t use chemicals, your plants love coffee grounds and your roses will flourish with them.

apples

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Apples, did you know there are over 7500 varities world wide? It is the number one fruit eaten in the U.S. and rightly so. With no fat, sodium or cholesterol it is only 80 calories and 25% of it is water, that is why they float. It takes 36 apples to make one gallon of cider. And did you know the largest producers of apples is China?

This blossom is from one of my two apple trees in my backyard and it has yet to produce a harvest. It takes about 5-6 years to produce fruit, and as I am not quite patient, I do enjoy the beautiful blooms. Polinated by bees, I try and plant bee loving plants around the yard.

pumpkin facts

pumpkin

Did you know that a pumpkin is a fruit? Yes, the countless varieties of pumpkins are in the same family as squash, cucumbers and melons. Its origin dates back to about 5000 B.C. in North America. Pumpkins are among the most versatile fruits that exist. They have been used to make mats by Native Americans; the shells were dried and then weaved. The shells were dried and used as containers and bowls. Medicinally, they have been used to treat fever, parasites, and kidney problems etc. etc. Long a staple in diets, the flowers seeds and meat are considered delicacies in certain cultures.

We all know about the virtues of pumpkin pies and roasted seeds, but the pumpkin seed oil is the prize for me. Pumpkin seed oil is packed with everything you need for glowing skin. Pumpkin seed oil contains fatty acids, alpha hydroxy acid, vitamins A, C,  E, and zinc. The oil is a powerhouse of anti-aging ingredients that boost collagen production, increase cell renewal that brightens and smooths the skin. Other added benefits include the diminishing of environmental skin damage and reducing break outs. If you love pumpkin seed oil – try our nourishing body oil.

mulberries

It is mulberry season in my backyard and the birds are beginning to devour the sweet fruit.  Mulberries are actually berries but a fruit cluster that looks like berries. Leaves of white mulberry trees are eaten by silkworms in China to enhance silk production. The Romans used the leaves for medicinal purposes and in German folklore the fruit was associated with evil and it was thought the devil used the root of the tree to polish his boots. White mulberries are native to Asia and the red mulberry is native to America and is grown in almost every state. The darker berried trees live up to 100 years whereas the white only live around 70.

 

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