blue yarrow essential oil

yarrow

Blue Yarrow Essential Oil

Blue yarrow essential oil is actually not blue. Yarrow has over 100 active ingredients including flavonoids, tannins, silica, amino acids and the list goes on. Like chamomile, yarrow contains azulene that produces the rich vibrant blue.

The lovely sky blue color occurs when the leaves and flower tops are distilled to make the essential oil. The flowerheads are yellow, white and pink. With over 30 cultivars, the native yarrow is cream or white. This pink one in my backyard turns creams after being this subtle pink. The leaves of some have a spicy bitter aroma. 

The essential oil is known for it’s healing of the skin and is most often used in treating acne and blemishes. It has a rich herbaceous aroma that is soothing and relaxing. It is used in steambaths to rid the body of toxins. Our new pore clarifying mask has blue yarrow essential oil.

Yarrow History

Yarrow, is one the world’s oldest medicinal plants. .  Yarrow is a hardy wildflower that can be found around the globe.It’s healing properties are chronicled throughout history beginning with the Romans. The Greeks and Romans used the herb during battles to heal wounds and to stop the flow of blood. In Mythology, Achilles, the Greek hero of the Trojan War, used yarrow to help heal the tendon injured ankleNative American used the dried leaves and flowers heads in a paste to treat sunburn and other skin ailments. It was thought to also cure baldness. It has been used to reduce anxiety and stress in tea form or in infusions. As a tea it is known to reduce fevers and diminish migraines.

It was thought to have magical powers and some thought it would guard against evil spirits if hung above your door. In Ireland it was hung above the door on midsummer night’s eve to protect the homeowners from disease. Its leaves and flowers were used to brew beer in the Middle Ages.

 

anise hyssop

Native to the Midwest, anise hyssop is a member of the mint family. Bees and butterflies are hovering over my anise hyssop that is flourishing in this heat wave. Aromatic of licorice and anise, it was planted in the 1870s to attract honeybees. Historically it has been used to guard against evil spirits, as a cough suppressant and as a wash against poison ivy and leprosy. Culinary uses include tea for digestion, salads, jellies and the seeds in cookies. anise

yogurt cheese & herb biscuits

Biscuits, just like grits, aren’t just for breakfast anymore. Biscuits as I always say are love message, biscuits are always made by hand with love like my Grandmother used to make. These are yogurt cheese biscuits with clipping from my yard; rosemary, lemon verbena, basil, lavender and mint. But you can literally take any herb in your yard and had to make savory biscuits. Just minutes to make!

  • 2 cups flour
  • 3 tsps. baking soda
  • 1 cup Greek yogurt (or you can substitute with milk or sour cream)
  • ¼ cup olive
  • Herbs to your tasting from your yard about 1-2 tsps.
  • Grated emmental cheese about a tblsp.
  • Pinch of salt

Mix it all together and don’t let it sit long and it is better mixing with your hands.  I usually put a drop of olive oil on the top before sticking in the oven. Bake at 375 for about 11 minutes. Check to make sure the bottoms are golden and the tops a tad golden. yougurt biscuitsAnd voila! Delicious biscuits!