Tupelo Honey

grits honey

Tupelo honey

Tupelo honey is often referred to as Southern gold or the Queen of honey and rightly so. This velvety honey is the only honey diabetics can eat. Its high fructose content means that it is quickly absorbed by the body. Compared to other honeys it is has a longer release of energy making it also perfect for athletes. This also makes it the only honey that doesn’t crystallize, it remains liquid for years.

The Tree

The Ogeechee Tupelo tree was named for the river in Georgia where it was discovered by William Bartram, the Ogeechee River. It is also called sour tupelo gum, white tupelo, and bee tupelo. The trees grow in swamps. Therefore, the beehives are on stilts for them to gather the nectar from the female trees that have the blossoms. As the flower is like a magnolia, quite delicate, the hives have to be close to the trees. The red fruit of the tree ripens in autumn and can be made into jams and as a substitute for limes.

The Bees

Timing is everything with tupelo honey harvesting. And of course, the bees. Honey bees can produce about ½ tsp of honey in its lifetime and it take about two million flowers to produce one pound of honey. This is probably why they are called worker bees. Tupelo honey has always been my favorite especially in my grits honey scrub.

Spring Skincare Products We Love

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On Sale in Honor of Spring!

 

Spring is in the Air

Time to break out your spring skincare products! Now that the sun is out and nature is in bloom, cold winter nights wrapped up inside by the fire are replaced by outside adventures and lighthearted evenings on a patio. Life is in full bloom, and it is time to celebrate.

Spring is a Big Bouquet of Flowers

Bright colors and rich greens rejuvenate sleepy landscapes, and nature fills the air with the budding aroma of flowers, trees, and fruits. Inspired by spring’s natural bounty, HollyBeth created her signature Flourish Perfume, a delightful combination of jasmine and rose mixed with hints of lavender and bergamot. Soft scents of floral and earth perfectly combine to evoke the blooming flavors of a new beginning. It is the perfect perfume to add to your spring skincare products.

Spring is an Orchard of Fresh Fruit

Crisp citrus flavors of orange and lemon energize the spirits and uplift the soul. One of my favorite HollyBeth Organics spring skincare products is her Citrus All Over Cream. A refreshing blend of camellia, jojoba, and sweet almond oil adorned with lemon, lime, and orange essential oils create this delicious moisturizing cream that nourishes the skin and tantalizes the senses. And as an added bonus, the citrus-based cream naturally repels pesky bugs! Looking for a spring skincare shea butter? Try HollyBeth’s Lemon Lime Shea Butter Cream. This southern-inspired cream infused with invigorating lime and lemon enlivens the skin with happy hydration. And in honor of spring, HollyBeth Organics’ Lemon Lime Shea Butter is on sale! Click here to add this zesty moisturizing cream to your spring skincare routine.

Spring has arrived! Time to let your skin enjoy it, too.

Happy Leap Day!

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Happy Leap Day!

Happy leap day! Tis that extra lucky day (or believed to be extra unlucky by some) that comes every four years to keep us in sync with the solar / seasonal year. It actually takes the Earth 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 46 seconds to complete its orbit (around 365.25 days), so an extra day is added to the calendar to keep us in tune with that additional time.

Spring Inspiration

And who doesn’t appreciate additional time? No matter what your superstitions about today may be, an extra day on the calendar gives us all a little bit more life to live! And with spring just around the corner, what better time to be inspired by the beauty of the Earth. The flowers will be blooming, the trees will be in color again, and nature will be in full swing as everything comes back to life.

Natural Ingredients

Did you know that all of HollyBeth Organics’ ingredients come from flowers and trees? From camellia, rose, geranium, sunflower, jasmine and lavender, to avocado, carrot and pumpkin, all of our certified organic products are made of the Earth’s finest natural resources. Want to read more about the ingredients HollyBeth uses to create her skin care solutions? Check out our Ingredients page to discover more about what goes into her products.

Now go out there and seize the (extra) day!

History of Cardamom

 

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Cardamom is a spice that comes from the seed pods of various ginger plants. Native to India and popular throughout Asia, Cardamom is the world’s third most expensive spice, famous for its aromatic and healing properties. It commonly used in food, medicine, and skincare.

Cooking with Cardamom

There are two main types of cardamom: green and black. Green, also called true cardamom, comes from an aromatic perennial herb plant. It is widely used in Indian cuisine, and is a popular spice used in baking sweets as well as flavoring coffee and tea. Black Cardamom has more of a smoky flavor, commonly used in meat dishes and soups. Both are found in popular sweet and savory dishes such as curry pastes and masalas.

Healing Powers

Cardamom also boasts natural healing abilities, prominently utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine. Its natural oil is packed with antioxidants and can be used as an antiseptic, an anti-inflammatory, and a digestion aid. Cardamom seeds are often chewed on for oral health, providing relief from mouth ulcers and combating bad breath.

Skin Solutions

Cardamom essential oil comes from steam distillation of the spice. It creates a rich, yellow oil with an invigorating, bittersweet smell. The sweet, spicy aroma invigorates the senses and calms anxiety. Ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans used this fragrant oil in perfumes, incense, and mouth washes. It is also used as a massage oil due to its warming sensation and skin-soothing properties.

This luxurious essential oil can be found in HollyBeth Organics’ Body Polish, adding that hint of spice while promoting circulation and calming the muscles. It is the ultimate body scrub for relaxation and rejuvenation. The Ancient Egyptians would be jealous.

No wonder cardamom is so highly valued – this sumptuous spice can do it all!

 

Sources: Wikipedia, ABOUT.COM

10 nature loving reads

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Summer Books
Summer’s hallmark lazy, hazy days and laid back schedules offer ample time to dig into a stack of books for some porch-rocking, hammock-swinging, beach-sitting, lake-floating, story-reading delight. This year, let nature provide inspiration for a summer reading list that showcases the original literary muse as the main character. We’ve picked out a few suggestions to set your mind a-bloom and grow your curiosity.

Anthill by Edward O. Wilson

When a Pulitzer-prize winning biologist decides to write a coming-of-age novel, a modern-day classic emerges. Wilson displays the relentless struggle between man and nature through the heroic actions of boy fighting for the land he loves.

Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken

The subtitle — How The Largest Movement In The World Came Into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming — says it all to describe this thought-provoking work on the origins of modern initiatives for environmental awareness and social justice. Grassroots campaigns have successfully tapped into a collective consciousness with a magnificent ripple effect. Drop your pebble in the water…

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

A talented florist, who survives a lonely childhood in foster-care, becomes fascinated by the Victorian tradition of using flowers to express specific sentiments. As she learns more about the beautiful messages conveyed in the blossoms, she weeds out the nettles from her own painful past.

Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv

Establishing a strong connection with nature has always been a vital part of the human experience, yet our modern world increasingly parks us inside a technology bubble. Louv reports on the empirical need for children to enjoy regular exposure to the natural world and to enhance their education with significant time outdoors.

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe

A Harvard doctorate student finds herself engrossed in the pages of an Puritan woman’s journal, then following a trail of healing herbs and ancient ayurvedic-style recipes that leads her right into the madness of the Salem Witch Trials.

Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier

The author that enraptured readers in The Girl with the Pearl Earring takes on the scientific discoveries of 19th century Britain and the classism creating a cultural “survival of the fittest”. Based on a true story of an uneducated British common woman whose fossil collections impressed the leading scientists of her time.

The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen

Escape to Nepal on this journey of spiritual discovery as the author accompanies a field biologist on a research climb. The extended trek leads to an emotional quest for both of them.

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

Born in the Age of Enlightenment and living through the Industrial Revolution, a botanist continues the research of her brilliant father even as her inherent need for questioning is challenged by her love affair with a captivating nature artist. Their relationship must weather the conflicts of Religion and Reason, Science and Spiritualism, Passion and Purpose.

The Thing with Feathers by Noah Strycker

From migration patterns to mating rituals, homing tendencies to nesting techniques, the distinctive behaviors of various bird species can teach us volumes about our own humanity. The truth about instinct and intelligence may be soaring right above us or perched on the limb of a favorite tree.

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

With a signature wit and precise execution Bryson puts a hysterical twist on the basic travel guide as he attempts an ambitious hike along Appalachian Trail. Lace up your boots and prepare to giggle. (Hint: Read it quick before the new feature film hits the big screen later this year.)

Azaleas

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Azaleas, in the same family as rhododendrons, can live for hundreds of years. Native to Japan, they can reach a height of 12 feet. With over 10,000 different varieties, one is at a loss to choose between them.  This one is golden azalea or native azalea and is blooming in my backyard. Folklore remedies properties include hypertension and cough. Azaleas symbolize modern, forbearance and temperance.

zinnias

Zinnias might be my new favorite flower. Throw the seeds in the yard and they are prolific bright flowers that attract an array of butterflies. They are such generous bloomers. When you cut zinnias for a vase, cut above the next set of leaves and you will have a new flower in days on the same stalk.  Purple wildflowers native to Mexico, they were considered eye sores to the Spaniards when taken back to Spain as seeds. The current majestic colors are hybrids that became quite popular in Victorian gardens in the 18th century. Red zinnias represent constancy, pink lasting affection and friendship for all zinnias.

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animal camouflage

mothAs I walked out the door this morning I thought this was a leaf, but it is a moth. Animals are masters at self defense and changing their appearance to match their environment. The most common is the the chameleon that can change colors on a whim. One of the most amazing is the Indonesian Mimic Octopus. One of my favorites is the Malaysian Orchid Mantis, how lovely to live in orchids unseen. Now that I think about it – how many animals have we NOT seen?

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