Pomegranate Seed Oil

History

Pomegranate seed oil began it’s journey literally eons ago. Native to Persia the pomegranate is one of the oldest fruits on the planet. It was known as the nectar of the Gods. Its first journey was to China in 100 B.C. For Christians the pomegranate represents hope of life eternal. Some scholars believe it was the pomegranate and not the apple that was the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden.

For the Jewish religion, it represents righteousness. In China it represents wealth and is a common wedding present. In Buddhism, it is one of the three blessed fruits along with peaches and citrus.

The varied uses of the tree and fruit include tanning leather, treating leprosy and dyspepsia.

The Fruit

Pomegranates grow on a shrub that can be pruned to look like a tree. They can grow to 20 feet in height. There are some shrubs in Europe that have lived for 200 years. Although there are hundreds of cultivars, only 14 grow in the U.S

Pomegranate Seed Oil

200 pounds of pomegranate seeds are need to make 16 ounces of pomegranate seed oil. There are approximately 800 seeds per fruit. This luxurious oil is made by cold pressing the organic seeds.

The luscious oil produced by the pomegranate seeds contains flavonoids, antioxidants and punicic acid, a fatty acid. This reduces inflammation and hydrates as well as protecting the skin and repairing from sun damage. These components aid in protecting and firming the skin. Research has proven the efficacy of the oil on the skin in its ability to stimulate cell growth of the epidermis. Coupled with its bounty of antioxidants this is a must for glowing and healthy skin.

It easily penetrates the skin without leaving a greasy residue making it perfect for oily and dry skin. The oil is viscous and only a small amount is needed for the skin.

This prized oil is found in our eye serum, nourishing body oil and body balm.

Dry Brushing

dry brush
dry brushing

What is dry brushing?

Dry brushing has been used for centuries around the globe. The Chinese used fibers of a fruit called silk squash. Native Americans used corn cobs. As a child my mother would use cornmeal. In all cases the premise is the same: the scrubbing must be done on dry skin.

30 years ago a Finnish doctor began recommending his patients to dry brush to stimulate, exofoliate and detoxify the body. This appears to have taken dry brushing from cleansing to detoxifying. Over a third of the germs and toxins in our body are excreted through our skin. Logic would tell us that increasing this flow is beneficial to the skin through dry brushing.

My first experience was years ago in Morocco in a small village bathhouse where stones similar to pumice were used. In Finland, I had a similar treatment but birch twigs were used instead of a brush. When I lived in France, a similar procedure was used on dry skin to reduce cellulite.

How to

Brush before your bath when you are completely dry, standing in the shower or tub. Brush towards your heart starting at your feet.  Be gentle and stay away from any cuts, bruises or sensitive skin areas. After brushing, bathe in lukewarm water and follow up with your favorite nourishing body oil. Clean your brush regularly and store it in a dry place.

Benefits

The main benefit is exfoliation – no more dead cells on the skin surface.  Your skin will be baby soft. In winter we tend to have drier and flakier skin so dry brushing makes the skin healthier. It eliminates black heads by cleansing your pores of toxins and debris.

It circulates blood full that helps eliminate toxins and waste from our largest organ: our skin. Proponents of dry brushing claim that it stimulates the lymph flow thus detoxifying the body. The reasoning is that the lymph system is just below the skin’s service and the brushing increases activity and flow. It is known to tighten the skin reducing the appearance of cellulite. 

As it opens your pores, the skin absorbs more easily moisturizers and lotions. We of course, use our body oil afterwards. Scented with ylang ylang and black pepper essential oils, this luxurious Body Oil seduces the senses to a state of repose. With each use, skin is optimally hydrated, smoothed, and softened, giving the body an enviable glow.

 

 

 

 

 

Tips for Relaxing During the Work Week

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Tips for Relaxing During the Work Week

It is almost the weekend – but not quite yet. There is still one more day of meetings, deadlines, errands, appointments, and obligations that demand your attention. By the time the weekend comes around, all of your energy has been zapped, and two days on the sofa with a movie marathon and some takeout sounds amazing, right? It’s an ongoing cycle of all work then all rest. Tired of being tired all weekend? Here are some ways to balance work with relaxation all week long.

Turn Off Your TV

We have all been behind that person in traffic with a “kill your TV” bumper sticker. Not the extent that I’m suggesting, but a few nights with the television turned off will give your brain some much-needed R&R. Give your mind a chance to recoup from sensory overload, and allow yourself to focus on something soothing, like a book or some music.

Get Physical

Sitting in an office chair all week can make anyone feel sluggish. Keep yourself energized by incorporating some kind of physical activity into your daily routine. I’m not preaching a 6:00am boot camp workout; I mean start your morning out with some good stretches or step away from your desk for an afternoon walk. Anything that gets you moving!

Have Fun

We all have things we are obligated to do; however, it is important to treat yourself with some time to do what you want to do. Catch up with some friends over dinner, check out that new movie, enjoy a good concert – whatever it is that puts a smile on your face (and rewards you for all that hard work you do).

Take Care of Yourself

Your physical health has an effect on your mental health. Take care of yourself! Just as your body benefits from pure, natural foods, go for clean, organic skincare products that will keep your skin balanced and hydrated. Check out HollyBethOrganics.com to discover skincare solutions that will keep you looking good and feeling good. One of my favorites is the Nourishing Body Oil. Just add a few drops to a hot bath for a spa-like moisturizing treatment!

Life is about balance. All work and no play . . . well, you know what I mean.

Pumpkin Facts

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Did You Know That a Pumpkin is a Fruit?

Yes, the countless varieties of pumpkins are in the same family as squash, cucumbers and melons. Its origin dates back to about 5000 B.C. in North America. Pumpkins are among the most versatile fruits that exist. The shells have been used to make bowls and mats by Native Americans. Medicinally, they have been used to treat acne, fever, parasites, and kidney problems etc. etc. Long a staple in diets, the flowers seeds and meat are considered delicacies in certain cultures.

What About Pumpkin Seed Oil?

We all know about the virtues of pumpkin pies and roasted seeds, but the pumpkin seed oil is the prize for me. Pumpkin seed oil is packed with everything you need for glowing skin. Pumpkin seed oil contains fatty acids, alpha hydroxy acid, vitamins A, C,  E, and zinc. The oil is a powerhouse of anti-aging ingredients that boost collagen production, increase cell renewal that brightens and smooths the skin. Other added benefits include the diminishing of environmental skin damage and reducing break outs. If you love pumpkin seed oil – try our nourishing body oil and body oil.