Tupelo Honey

grits honey

Tupelo honey

Tupelo honey is often referred to as Southern gold or the Queen of honey and rightly so. This velvety honey is the only honey diabetics can eat. Its high fructose content means that it is quickly absorbed by the body. Compared to other honeys it is has a longer release of energy making it also perfect for athletes. This also makes it the only honey that doesn’t crystallize, it remains liquid for years.

The Tree

The Ogeechee Tupelo tree was named for the river in Georgia where it was discovered by William Bartram, the Ogeechee River. It is also called sour tupelo gum, white tupelo, and bee tupelo. The trees grow in swamps. Therefore, the beehives are on stilts for them to gather the nectar from the female trees that have the blossoms. As the flower is like a magnolia, quite delicate, the hives have to be close to the trees. The red fruit of the tree ripens in autumn and can be made into jams and as a substitute for limes.

The Bees

Timing is everything with tupelo honey harvesting. And of course, the bees. Honey bees can produce about ½ tsp of honey in its lifetime and it take about two million flowers to produce one pound of honey. This is probably why they are called worker bees. Tupelo honey has always been my favorite especially in my grits honey scrub.

Pumpkins and Bees

bluewhite

Pumpkins and bees are heavy on my mind this morning. It is Saturday morning and I really didn’t intend to get on a soap box on a business page but it affects my business…. bees.

A World With No Bees?

Without bees we wouldn’t have these gorgeous blue, pink, red and orange pumpkins at Lucy’s market, unheard of colors when I was growing up as a pumpkin was always and only orange. No jack o lanterns, no pumpkin pies without the bees. Why? Because bees pollinate pumpkins. So the next time you think about swatting a bee think twice and kiss it instead. Without the bees you wouldn’t have 1 out of 7 bites of food or honey. Honey is the point of this tirade…. tupelo honey – found in our grits and honey scrub – is only found in the south… supposedly. However, as there was NO crop of tupelo honey this year I have to buy from last year’s supply. And here is where you, the consumer, might or should be upset: the farm I found is in Florida but the honey is shipped to Michigan – so I am buying from Michigan. Maybe I am the only person that finds this odd and/or carbon footprint crazy. The bees don’t have a carbon foot print only humans. The bottom line: we need the bees and unless you live under a rock you know we are losing them. So, I have decided to plant tupelo trees in the hopes that I can have bee hives…. if it is not too late. What are you going to do?