The Benefits of Cucumber

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The Benefits of Cucumber

The benefits of cucumber go beyond your salad plate. Packed with vitamins and antioxidants, cucumbers not only benefit the waistline, but also the health of your body and skin.

The Ultimate Water Fruit

Cucumbers, which belong to the same family as squash and watermelon, have one of the highest water contents of any solid food. With over 95% water content, cucumbers are extremely hydrating. Around 20% of our daily water intake comes from food, therefore eating this H2O-heavy fruit is a great way to meet your daily water intake.

Nourish the Body

Cucumbers are packed with vitamin A and C, in addition to B vitamins, potassium, and caffeic acid. These are all powerful antioxidants that reduce inflammation and also calm irritation. Combined with its high levels of water, cucumbers nourishing and hydrating effects help prevent memory loss, support a healthy digestive and cardiovascular system, relieve stress and anxiety, and also enhance the health of your skin.

Hydrate the Skin

This superfood is a great addition to your skin care regimen. Its soothing and calming effects help shrink irritated blood vessels, reducing the appearance of puffy eyes and redness. Cucumbers also fight skin irritation, aiding in the relief of sunburn and skin inflammation. And to top it all off, the extreme concentration of water and vitamin C keep the skin smooth, hydrated, and cooled.

Stay Cool this Summer

HollyBeth utilizes these amazing skin-nourishing properties in her best-selling Body Mist. This cucumber-based hair and skin refresher is the perfect addition to your beach bag. Just spritz it over your head and body to stay cool and revitalize the skin. A definite must-have for the hot days of summer.

Organic Bug Spray: The Chemical-Free Solution to Mosquitos

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Summertime Weather

Summer is almost here, and chances are you will be spending a lot of time outdoors. Backyard cookouts, weekends by the pool, dog walks in the park, and dinners on the patio – life seems to move outside as soon as the sun comes out. And as much as we love the warm weather, so do the bugs.

Pesky Mosquitos

While they feed on nectar and sugar for nourishment, female mosquitos need the protein found in blood in order to make eggs .They find us by sensing the carbon dioxide we put out when we breathe, as well as the chemicals in our sweat. Are you a fan of wearing bright colors? Mosquitos are visually attracted to colors that stand out in comparison to the scenery. To top it all off, they can detect heat, so all of us warm-blooded humans have nowhere to hide.

Traditional Bug Sprays

Anti-pest sprays are a good way to keep the bugs away, but the chemical smell can be overwhelming. Some people would rather get a few mosquito bites than shower themselves with pesticides. Citronella candles provide some relief but only protect a small area. A solution that is chemical free, smells great, and protects you no matter where you are is an organic bug spray.

Citrus Spray Insect Repellent

HollyBeth Organics’ Citrus Spray Insect Repellent to the rescue! This organic bug spray was inspired by HollyBeth’s Citrus All Over Cream, which clients began to use to keep the bugs at bay. Harnessing the natural insect repelling properties of bergamot, orange, and lemon combined with lavender and tea tree oil, this delightfully fragrant organic spray mists the body with uplifting citrus while providing expert protection against mosquitos and bugs. Get outdoors and enjoy your summer, bug free and chemical free!

10 nature loving reads

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Summer Books
Summer’s hallmark lazy, hazy days and laid back schedules offer ample time to dig into a stack of books for some porch-rocking, hammock-swinging, beach-sitting, lake-floating, story-reading delight. This year, let nature provide inspiration for a summer reading list that showcases the original literary muse as the main character. We’ve picked out a few suggestions to set your mind a-bloom and grow your curiosity.

Anthill by Edward O. Wilson

When a Pulitzer-prize winning biologist decides to write a coming-of-age novel, a modern-day classic emerges. Wilson displays the relentless struggle between man and nature through the heroic actions of boy fighting for the land he loves.

Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken

The subtitle — How The Largest Movement In The World Came Into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming — says it all to describe this thought-provoking work on the origins of modern initiatives for environmental awareness and social justice. Grassroots campaigns have successfully tapped into a collective consciousness with a magnificent ripple effect. Drop your pebble in the water…

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

A talented florist, who survives a lonely childhood in foster-care, becomes fascinated by the Victorian tradition of using flowers to express specific sentiments. As she learns more about the beautiful messages conveyed in the blossoms, she weeds out the nettles from her own painful past.

Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv

Establishing a strong connection with nature has always been a vital part of the human experience, yet our modern world increasingly parks us inside a technology bubble. Louv reports on the empirical need for children to enjoy regular exposure to the natural world and to enhance their education with significant time outdoors.

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe

A Harvard doctorate student finds herself engrossed in the pages of an Puritan woman’s journal, then following a trail of healing herbs and ancient ayurvedic-style recipes that leads her right into the madness of the Salem Witch Trials.

Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier

The author that enraptured readers in The Girl with the Pearl Earring takes on the scientific discoveries of 19th century Britain and the classism creating a cultural “survival of the fittest”. Based on a true story of an uneducated British common woman whose fossil collections impressed the leading scientists of her time.

The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen

Escape to Nepal on this journey of spiritual discovery as the author accompanies a field biologist on a research climb. The extended trek leads to an emotional quest for both of them.

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

Born in the Age of Enlightenment and living through the Industrial Revolution, a botanist continues the research of her brilliant father even as her inherent need for questioning is challenged by her love affair with a captivating nature artist. Their relationship must weather the conflicts of Religion and Reason, Science and Spiritualism, Passion and Purpose.

The Thing with Feathers by Noah Strycker

From migration patterns to mating rituals, homing tendencies to nesting techniques, the distinctive behaviors of various bird species can teach us volumes about our own humanity. The truth about instinct and intelligence may be soaring right above us or perched on the limb of a favorite tree.

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

With a signature wit and precise execution Bryson puts a hysterical twist on the basic travel guide as he attempts an ambitious hike along Appalachian Trail. Lace up your boots and prepare to giggle. (Hint: Read it quick before the new feature film hits the big screen later this year.)